All posts tagged: Writing Prompts

How to Tackle NaNoWriMo: My Advice To You (Day 5 of Countdown) #NaNoWriMo #Writing

There are now less than 24 hours left before the worldwide writing frenzy of NaNoWriMo begins! Before you begin, I would like to give you my last token of creative advice. Create a Soundtrack for your novel. Now, I imagine that this may have you thinking of soundtrack in the same way one thinks of a movie soundtrack. Well, that is not exactly what I am referring to here. Movie soundtracks are designed to emotionally lead the audience in a specific emotional direction while watching the movie unfold. If a romantic scene is on the horizon, cue the sexy music. If suspense, then in comes the music that gets your pulse racing. With the soundtrack for your novel,  collect tracks that get you into the head of your characters and reminds you of the spirit of your story as a whole. Now there are songs that you can gather that help you to build certain scenes, similar to the way movies do, and those are helpful as well. For me, I generally have specific songs …

How to Tackle NaNoWriMo: My Advice To You (Day 2 of Countdown) #NaNoWriMo #Writing

  FRIENDS ARE THE BEST! INVITE A READER ON YOUR JOURNEY WITH YOU. Making the big decision to commit to writing a 50,000-word tome in 30 days is a PRETTY BIG decision to make. Now that you have done that, and have decided to take my advice on just writing whatever comes from your imagination, and flies out of your fingertips like magic sparks, allow me to offer you token number 2 that I learned in my experiences. TIP 2. Have an honest friend (One who will be straight with you if your plot is not great) support you by reading your daily progress. (This person is not writing, ONLY reading.) One of the biggest attractions of  NaNoWriMo is the worldwide support system that a writer becomes apart of for 30 days.  I read an article, a few years back, out of Writer’s Digest. That entire edition was dedicated to, you guessed it, NaNoWriMo, and it likened this experience to running a marathon, and how being surrounded by strangers with the same goal helps each …

3 Curious Ways to Build Character: Wisdom from the Writer’s Journal #writingtips #amwriting

When you build a character, you are really fueled by curiosity not answers. ~Andre Dubus III I believe Andre Dubus III put the art of building characters in perfect perspective. We as writers are indeed driven by curiosity. It is our ‘watching’ of the world, and those around us, that constructs who our characters are and ultimately become. Even in our minds, we watch them, the characters who live in our imaginations. When we allow the stories in our heads to tell themselves with an organic voice, we become witnesses, and thus stenographers if you will. We find our characters behaving naturally in their environments, shocking us with the choices they make, the thoughts they have, the people they connect with, their mannerisms. Curiously, we keep our eyes on them, jotting down every detail. We watch. We build. It becomes like a game of Jeopardy. We have the answers to who and why. The story that we write around these ‘answers’ is where the questions come from. The stories themselves are actually the questions. HERE …

Writing Guidelines…What you do with what you learn

One of the wisest things a writer can do to better their craft and navigate the path to their desired literary success is to realize that they, in fact, don’t know everything but have room to learn just about anything. One of the best things we can do to better gain wisdom is to learn from those who have gained the success that mirrors or resembles that which we are aiming for. A few years back my eldest sister created a creative writing workshop book while she was on sabbatical from teaching at the University level. I had the privilege of being her guinea pig for the project, using the workbook from start to finish. Out of the many writing exercises that she cleverly produced, the one that I enjoyed and affected me the most had to do with gleaning wisdom from the authors that I most read and/or admired. I was tasked with: Making a list of 4 of my favorite authors Find a quote of theirs that spoke about their writing process (and from …

5 Benefits of Participating in Writing Prompts: Wisdom from the Writer’s Journal

Writing prompt: (In my opinion is) The Creative springboard or theme from which a story is directed or born…In less fancy words, it is a writer willingly giving up creative control of their imaginative ideas in order to grow through the ‘prompting’ of someone else’s. I don’t know about you, but I really love writing prompts. Writing prompts do two things simultaneously; they cause us to surrender control while incubating our process in a controlled environment. Writing prompts create boundaries while enabling us to write with inhibition of our previously set creative  ‘boundaries.’ Through them, we sample other flavors of genre and creativity while learning to laugh again, gaining a creative adrenaline boost that comes from facing a challenge, whether it’s through the boundaries of a time-limit, word limit, or even theme or opening lines. If you want to grow your creative writing muscles, keep them toned, participate in a weekly writing prompt. Here are 5 benefits of doing so: 1. You know that you will have something to write about: Sometimes it seems our creative wells run …

Will You Create With Me: The Hope of Future Writing Prompts

Last year, about mid-way between starting this blog and now, I started developing Writing Prompts and Exercises. For at least the last few months I have not created a single prompt, as I have been striving to get my life in order so that I can have more time working on the blog and writing my beloved novels.  As March was reborn this 2015, I found myself asking the God of Creation, what was I supposed to do now that there were no distractions to keep me from blogging. I mean yes, the simple answer is to create blogs, but I am a person who likes to “sow” and not “throw” my seed if you get what I mean? In answer to my query, Yeshua Jesus gave me the simplest answer; “Do what you did at the beginning.” What did I do at the beginning? I allowed art to bear fruit in whatever way it saw fit, but I allowed it to do so within parameters. In short, I made a deal with myself and …