Chapter 28: Ascension Graveyard by Candice Coates

Ascension Graveyard..jpg 2

Chapter 28

The Encounter Blog interview with Etta Castle Teague

HL: I have to tell you that, meeting you, having this interview has changed my perspective of things so much. I admit, I was very uncomfortable at first.

ECT: In order to survive, all creatures must learn to adapt…change. Change is often a very painful experience. But bless it all if it isn’t worth it.

*          *          *

Wesley cupped the man’s hand before pulling him into a tight embrace. “It’s been too long, Uncle Arnie.” He smiled, leading the man beyond the front entryway of his home. Stepping into the front room he said, “Did you leave your bag in the car? I can go and get it.”

Arnold waved him off as he scanned the room with his eyes. It was a force of habit. Too many years on the force had ingrained it into him. “No, son, I rented a room outside of town.” He finally brought his steely eyes in line with his nephews. “Fewer distractions the better. If I stay here, I’ll get to thinking about your folks or worse, find myself fishing until the lakes are empty. Neither are good ideas, though the later is beyond tempting.” He cupped Wesley’s shoulder and nudged him towards the sofa. Wesley didn’t resist.

They spent a few minutes on catching up. Arnold Anderson had always been like a second father to Wesley. When Wesley’s father died of a heart attack several years ago, Arnold had made it a point to fill in the gap that his brother-in-law had left in the boy’s life. It wasn’t easy living out of state or working the crazy hours that he was required to work. But he did the best he could. Felons didn’t keep nine to five shifts.

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Chapter 28: Ascension Graveyard by Candice Coates

  1. I like this strong voice. I can hear it and see his demeanour.
    “Arnold waved him off as he scanned the room with his eyes. It was a force of habit. Too many years on the force had ingrained it into him. “No, son, I rented a room outside of town.” He finally brought his steely eyes in line with his nephews. “Fewer distractions the better. If I stay here, I’ll get to thinking about your folks or worse, find myself fishing until the lakes are empty. Neither are good ideas, though the later is beyond tempting.” 😀 😀

    1. 😀 Your comment has made my day! I’ve told you what a struggle this story has been for the past 3 years lol. You make me feel like we are making good headway with it and that there is hope for it yet. lol

  2. Okay, burned through all the chapters back-to-back and this is my overall read: I like it. It’s engaging. Also, you can write. Let no one tell you otherwise. Plus you have good characterization and your characters are complex and believable. This is probably the most important ability a write can possess, bar none. Also, your people are broken. This is hard to do.

    This story runs on mystery. You introduce a situation and give tidbits of information, but are constantly withholding key points, giving out answers only in drabs. Your tactic for advancing the plot looks more like juggling than sowing, or perhaps like lining up dominoes set to fall in one of those insanely complex domino picture pieces. That’s not bad, it’s the style of this story. Stick with it. You’re pulling it off.

    However, I think you may be withholding a bit too much sometimes. Your story is composed of snapshots, but I personally would like the snapshots to be just a little bit longer in many cases. At present it’s hard to track what’s going on, and you tend to pull away right before anyone actually does anything.

    I think my biggest suggestion for improvement would be to up some of the information delivery in the narrative portions of each chapter, mainly the information regarding who did what when its something that happened for everyone to see, and to ask when you’re writing, “Am I showing, or telling?” and try to SHOW as much as possible. It’s much more interesting to SEE someone do something, and wonder why they’re doing it, than to hear people TALK or THINK about someone doing something, and wonder why they did it.

    Does that make sense?

    Still, and again, you have the core of a good story going. Keep moving. Also, I’d still love a read from you on Ember’s Heart if you can find the time.

    1. Wow! First, to go through that so quickly is amazing and I’m beyond grateful. Thank you for the feedback and the encouragement. I think you are correct that I need to show more than tell while also simply giving more information. I will keep that in mind during revisions. If it’s not too much to ask would you send me the link again to Embers Heart? I don’t read as swiftly as you tho. Thanks again.

      1. No, thank you. Also, as a side note, I believe the cutoff for displaying an article by its tags when people do a tag search is 12 or 13 tags. This means that it is best to have under 12-13 tags on any article, otherwise it won’t show up in tag searches. Or so I’ve read.

      2. Thank you for that. A journalist friend of mine mentioned something about articles needing to be over 750 words in order for Google to notice them immediately. I will keep this in mind about the tags…So many new things a girl is learning about algorithms and the web.

      3. For the tags, yes, but people can still do a search for related topics that we’ve blogged about through Google or Bing and if they are less that 75o words, our work gets lost in the shuffle. But yes I will be lowering my tags from now on.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s